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anne sexton cinderella analysis

anne sexton cinderella analysis

(2016, Jul 18). Anne Sexton’s “Cinderella” is a perfect example of Bettelheim’s definition of a Fairy Tale. The poet uses clear language, imagery, and diction in order to allow her speaker to speak on the life that she has lived, or would like to live. However, a classic fairy tale takes on a whole new perspective in Anne Sextons poem Cinderella. / She slept on the sooty hearth each night / and walked around looking like Al Jolson” (Line 30-32). It always goes something like this: poor girl meets prince…and POOF! Anne Sexton's Cinderella: An Analysis. In the dark comedic poem Cinderella, Anne Sexton forces the reader to examine this question. Sexton’s take on the story Cinderella is not based off of the well renowned Disney version, but rather the darker more adult Grimm Brother’s version. Utilizing literary devices such as tone, imagery, and style, Sexton encourages the reader to think about how silly and unlikely a fairy tale ending actually is. Through Sexton’s poem, the reader can receive the message of the happily ever concept, for we begin to realize that life is just never that easy and never runs a long, smooth road. Filed Under: Essays Tagged With: irony. Cinderella is also portrayed as being small minded and naive, when the author writes “she slept on a sooty hearth each night and walked around looking like Al Jolson. Sexton uses sarcasm as well as her own anecdotes to foreshadow the ending of the poem. Fairy tales hold the power to influence societies and to challenge societal injustices, and the story of Cinderella exemplifies both of these roles. Don't use plagiarized sources. On top of this, she always uses ironic imagery and also changes the reader’s view on the classic fairy tale ending. As a replacement for saying that everyone except Cinderella were getting ready for the ball, she says they were “gussying up for the big event. ” In both examples she narrows the gap between the fictional nature of fairy tales and the unfortunate truth of reality. Anne Sexton’s “’Daddy’ Warbucks” seems to address a father figure, in the fashion of a rich sugar daddy who has fought in the war. Just because Cinderella marries the prince does not necessary mean that they will live happily ever. “Cinderella and the prince / lived, they say, happily ever after, / like two dolls in a museum case / never bothered by diapers or dust, / never arguing over the timing of an egg” (Line 100-104), from these lines, Sexton is in fact changing her fairy tale into a myth, making Cinderella and the prince just a portraits hung on the wall. If a person runs off and gets married, it never turns out quite like a fairy tale. Anne Sexton’s poem “Cinderella” is filled with literary elements that emphasize her overall purpose and meaning behind this satirical poem. Sexton continues to convey her cynical ideas when she says “Next came the ball, as you all know” and “That’s the way with stepmothers. The line “That story” (Line 5), which is repeated numerous times throughout the poem, makes the readers think of the original Cinderella fairytale. Both works centre on the same plot - the story of a young unfortunate girl who finds happiness. We assume that Cinderella and the prince marry, and of course, lived happily ever after. Additional materials, such as the best quotations, synonyms and word definitions to make your writing easier are also offered here. In this version, Cinderella is a poor young girl that lives with her father, two wicked stepsisters, and despicable stepmother, after her own mother dies. / They don’t just heal up like a wish” (Lines 81-86). We’ve always read or been read fairy tales once in our lives, and how do they always end? ” Sexton manipulates our idea of the usual handsome prince charming, riding in on a horse to save Cinderella by comparing him to a shoe salesman, a rather unsavory character. The use of hyperbole and irony in this last stanza evokes an emotion of sadness. spam or irrelevant messages, We use cookies to give you the best experience possible. With the use of her sarcasm, Sexton, depicts to the reader how far the stepsister went to achieve her happily ever after ending. The first one cut off her toe, and the second cut off her heel. The white dove brought all his friends; all the warm wings of the fatherland came, and picked up the lentils in a jiffy. Cinderella Lyrics. Is this even a realistic thought? "Cinderella" Analysis Through literary devices such as simile, repetition and symbolism, Anne Sexton delivers the message that there is no way to live "happily ever after." Anne Sexton’s Cinderella: An Analysis. Sextons perspective on the acclaimed childhood story is fairly different than what popular culture and the media wishes to present. Cinderella is described as, “Cinderella was their maid. Annie, the narrator of the poem, is orphaned, filling the empty space of the father with a ‘Daddy’, of which she “knew your money/would save me”. We know that sometimes it's hard to find inspiration, so we provide you with hundreds of related samples.

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By | 2021-01-19T03:26:08+00:00 January 19th, 2021|Categories: Uncategorized|0 Comments

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